Common autism acronyms & abbreviations
Photo by ukrolenochka/Freepik

Common autism acronyms & abbreviations

Here’s a handy little guide to some of the most common autism abbreviations & acronyms you are likely to encounter while caring for and getting health and educational services for your special-needs child.

Common autism acronyms & abbreviations
AAC Assistive Augmentative Communication
ABA Applied Behavioral Analysis
ADA Americans with Disabilities Act
ADDM Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network
ADHD Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
ADI Autism Diagnostic Interview
APE Adaptive Physical Education
ASD Autism Spectrum Disorder
BASC Behavior Assessment System for Children
BIP Behavior Intervention Plan
CDC Centers for Disease Control
DD Developmental Disabilities
DSM-V Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (Fifth Edition)
dx Diagnosis
EEG Electroencephalogram
EIBI Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention
FAPE Free Appropriate Public Education
FBA Functional Behavioral Assessment
FCT Functional Communication Training
IDEA Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004)
IEP Individualized Education Program
IFSP Individualized Family Service Plan
LCSW Licensed Clinical Social Worker
LD Learning Disabled
LEA Local Education Agency
LFA Low-functioning Autistic or Low-functioning Autism
MDT Multidisciplinary Team
NET Natural Environment Teaching
NLP National Language Paradigm
NOS Not Otherwise Specified
NT Neurotypical
OCD Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
OT Occupational Therapy or Occupational Therapist
PBIS Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports
PDD Pervasive Developmental Disorder
PDD-NOS Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified
PECS Picture Exchange Communication System
PLEP Present Levels of Educational Performance
PRT Pivotal Response Training
SAT Student Assistance Team
SCQ Social Communication Questionnaire
SD Standard Deviation
SEA State Educational Agency
TEACCH Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication Handicapped CHildren
More Stories
Dad with happy sweet daughter hugging him
Your parenting style really matters when you’re raising a special needs child